Search This Blog

Loading...

Friday, February 27, 2015

Competition Nature In The City - Hahnemuhle

Looking for green oasis – painting competition on “Nature in the City” starts

An urban park with skyline, lined up flower pots on the balcony or a vegetable garden on the high-rise rooftop – show us your green oasis in an urban environment or your dream of it. Hahnemühle’s new painting competition is now open. Nature in the City” is the trendy theme for our art calendar 2016. We look forward to many internationalsubmissions and want to reach the record participation from last year againThe bar is set high: 1,200 images from 500 artists from 46 countries were submitted for the 2015calendarSo join in and tell others about the competition!
Kalenderwettbewerb2016_EN_Seite_1Our annual competition is open to allartists who like to paint, draw, illustrate,collage or print with traditional techniquesWe call for entries ofprofessionals and hobbyistsEachindividual is eligible. The only condition:your artwork must be created on a paper by Hahnemühle or LanaEach motif must be suitable for printing on the calendar in at least 40 x 30 cm inlandscape formatTo begin with, please submit digital files of your artwork. The uploadportal on our website will be open end of FebruaryDeadline is the 30.06.2015A jury is going to select 36 images for the shortlist and will pick 12 winning designs for the artscalendar 2016 this autumn. Participation in this international competition promisesworld-wide reputation to artistsHahnemühle´s art calendar is released in a limitededition only and is not for sale. Hahnemühle business partners all over the world get it every year as an exclusive collectible’ and display the pictures all over the worldThe winners will be awarded with ten calendars and a creative package with fine art papers by Hahnemühle.

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

John Salminen. Interview

John Salminen doesn`t need to be introduced. Here I am sharing my interview with this artists that will be released in my new book Masters Of Watercolor Vol III in June 2015. You are the first readers:)

What was your artistic background?
I have made art since I was a little boy. My mom kept me supplied with art materials and my dad, an engineer, taught me perspective at a very early age. I was intrigued by magazine illustration and my initial goal was to become an illustrator. My formal commitment to art began with my university training where abstract expressionism was in vogue. I became an abstract painter and I think the use of abstracted shapes and love of the process of moving paint from brush to paper continue to play a large role in my current paintings.

John Salminen. Jade.

What influenced you to become a watercolor artist?
My introduction to watercolor occurred in the classroom of University of Minnesota Professor Cheng Khee Chee. He was teaching a series of watercolor classes through night school and I enrolled for six consecutive courses. I found his approach to painting and his handling of the brush exciting and challenging and I have been a watercolorist ever since.

John Salminen. Kansas City Produce

What was the process of developing your own well recognized style?
My style developed slowly over an extended time as I was exposed to new approaches and incorporated them into my paintings. Each influence slightly changed my style as I learned new techniques and sensitivities. At first I was strongly influenced by the work and teaching of Cheng Khee Chee and painted in his design-based style. I was then influenced by the work of Robert Wood and the West Coast School of watercolorists. I studied with Frank Webb and this added new insight. At the same time I was very aware of the work of John Sloan and the Ashcan School. Every time I attended an exhibition, I saw something in a painting that impressed me - something that made me want to go to my studio to try out a new technique or work with atmosphere in a new way. My own style began to develop through the combination of all of these influences. When I first visited New York City, I discovered that the complexity of the city gave me an opportunity to apply my understanding of the elements of design, use techniques I had learned and focus on recreating the atmosphere I experienced as I wandered around the city. It was at that time that my style began to be recognizable. My work continues to change and evolve but now most of those changes come through challenges I set for myself rather than from outside influences.

John Salminen. Battery Park II

How do you work on composition?
My sense of composition is now intuitive rather than analytical but I only arrived at this point after years of study and practice. My original approach to painting was entirely design with little or no consideration of content. I was a practitioner of the Frank Webb-Edgar Whitney-Robert E Wood school of thought. Frank Webb said “paint shapes, not things”. Now as I look through the viewfinder of my camera I ‘feel’ when a composition is right but these feelings are based on solid design concepts.

John Salminen. Iceland.

Is there always a story to be told in your work?
In most cases I pick a subject because of the strength of the design and composition possibilities it suggests rather than its content. My work, however, often speaks to the viewer because of its recognizable subject and the implied emotion or atmosphere of the moment. I prefer to suggest rather than tell a story, encouraging the viewers to create their own interpretations of a painting from their personal experiences.

How do you choose the size for your painting?
I paint in a wide variety of sizes and shapes, ranging from 22” x 30” (56 cm x 76 cm) to 40” x 40” (102 cm x 102 cm). I choose a square or rectangular format based on the compositional needs of the painting. I enjoy painting large pieces because of the freedom of the brush strokes but size is sometimes determined by need - larger formats work well for exhibitions while collectors sometimes prefer smaller works.

John Salminen. Madison Square Park

What is your specific choice of art materials?
I have a strong preference for D’Arches 140 lb cold pressed paper because it’s tough and stands up well to masking and lifting but still accepts paint beautifully. I have no strong preference for any one brand of pigments and brushes. I like the random assortment of brushes I’ve accumulated over the years because they have become seasoned. They have acquired a distinctive feel and predictable behaviors. Today’s professional grade pigments are generally high quality and I use specific colors from a variety of brands, including Winsor Newton, Stephen Quiller, M. Graham and the new line QoR brand of watercolors recently created by Golden.

John Salminen. Neon Reflection

Do you change something in works once they are considered to be finished?
After I sign my work, I still have the option of tweaking it but once I have a professional scan made, I’m committed.

Is there a place for spontaneity in your works or do you prefer total control over the process?
There is tremendous opportunity for spontaneity in my process. As I work on a painting, I put it under plexiglass and a mat and look at the partially completed work at frequent intervals. Often the painting suggests changes or new directions. As I alter values the mood begins to shift and if I like the new direction I can continue with it and see where the painting will lead me. Although I work from photos, I try not to be limited by the information the camera records. I look for composition and design through the camera lens but I provide the emotional content myself through the development of mood and atmosphere. The feeling of the resulting piece is often the result of the spontaneity of the process.

John Salminen. Evening Cable Car

Your plein air and studio paintings differ so much that I could say they belong to different artists’ hands. Which is reflecting you the most?
My studio paintings require 40 - 60 hours to complete due to the amount of detail I like to include. This approach is not practical on location so I tend to work in a style that is closer to my earlier works, resembling the California style.

Does your painting on location help you in studio painting?
Painting on location gives me an opportunity to respond more directly to the quality of light and this is very beneficial. It helps me create atmosphere in my studio paintings.

John Salminen. April In Central Park

You are using a lot of dark colors. Do you agree with the statement that watercolor is partly graphic media?
If by ‘graphic’ you mean a high contrast statement the term could apply as my work does fully utilize value. ‘Graphic’ can also mean flat and I don’t feel watercolors, or at least my watercolors, are flat.

What do you consider more important in your work, tonal values or color?
Value, value, value! I like the statement “Value does the work, but color takes the credit”. I believe we perceive our world as shadow and light and this translates into relationships of value.

John Salminen. Rainy Day Times Square

What is watercolor media for you?
I use watercolor as a transparent medium in my representational work. I don’t use opaque pigments or white. However, when I create an abstract mixed medium work, I use collage, acrylics, markers... anything that creates the look I want to achieve.

How do you see watercolor in relation to other media?
In the United States, watercolor is the most widely practiced medium. This is partly due to the number of established watercolorists who are willing to teach. It’s also because of the extensive structure of competitive exhibitions that enables artists to share their work and to gain feedback from their peers. As a result of these things, artists are encouraged to learn and participate. This great popularity both helps ad hurts the reputation of watercolor when it comes to the way it is perceived by the art world. As is the case in many other countries, oil painting is sometimes viewed as a more serious medium and unfortunately in the United States this prejudice sometimes affects the monetary value of watercolor paintings as well as the respect watercolors are shown by museums and galleries.

http://www.johnsalminen.com

Thursday, January 15, 2015

New Discovery (For Me)

Mike Kowalski - an American artist who has re located to Australia. He has sent me a letter introducing his art.
I find his painting stunning! What do you think?

 Mike Kowalski. Bergstrom's

Mike Kowalski._DOWNTIME

Mike Kowalski.Read all about it

Monday, November 24, 2014

Elena Bazanova Exhibition

Last week I was invited to the opening of the Elena Bazanova`s exhibition at the Mokhovaya 18 gallery. It named "Living Space of Still Life". Amazing works, amazing people! Elena has surprised us again!

 Elena Bazanova

Elena Bazanova

 Elena Bazanova, artist and Anatoliy Knop, publisher

 The audience coudn`t fit in

Elena Bazanova and Konstantin Sterkhov

Elena Bazanova

Bookwang Noncharoeng

It was so unforgettable to get to the last day of the exhibition of Thai master of watercolor Boonkwang Noncharoen. Actually he made his exhibition 1 day longer to let us see it. We were a group of more than 20 International artists who participated the World Watermedia Exposition Thailand in May 2014 organized and sponsored by the Ministry of Culture and Modern Art of Thailand. Her I am sharing my impressions!











Igor Sava (Italy) and Bookwang Noncharoen (Thailand)

Thursday, October 2, 2014

FB Impressions of September

 Arnold Lawrey

Chin Li

 Dmitry Zhizhin

 Dmitry Zhizhin

 Ekaterina Zyuzina

 Endre Penovac

Endre Penovac

Water Surface, Reflection

Latest sketches on water subject - demo at my workshop in Yakutia, extreme Siberia...

 K. Sterkhov. Ladoga, 38x27 cm. 2014

K. Sterkhov. Stones and Ripples. 27x38 cm. 2014

Candle Flames - Demo

Konstantin Sterkhov. Candles Flame in a Temple, Sichuan, China. 50x32 cm

Friday, September 12, 2014

Step-by-step Demo 12.09.2014

Konstantin Sterkhov. Let The World Wait... and I`ll Be Reading. 54x75 cm
Saunders Waterford, 300 gm, CP, Daniel Smith paints.

 1. Masking and some texture.

 2. Background wet-in-wet. Wet from behind too.

3. Painting in the figure on wet.

4. Removing the masking. Fixing with tape on sides to continue on dry.

 5. Defining the focal area.

6. Working through the whole painting. Texture and values.

7. Final definition.

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Very Special.. 2 Masters of Watercolor

Ong Kim Seng: Hi Brother I think I can prove .whether its an Original Z or a fake ! You add in something very personal and original that no one else can imitate ! Even when the painting is hundred years old it can be proven!
Joseph Zbukvic: I remember that spot...we waited for ages for the bus to take us up the mountain ... But we obviously did not mind...we had a great time then 007... Thanks, Z
Chien Chung Wei: Just like two kids never grow up, very peaceful and warm ...

Ong Kim Seng (Singapore) and Joseph Zbukvic (Australia)

http://jzbukvic.com/
http://www.ongkimseng.com/

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Helsinki, All Colors Of The Autumn

Dear watercolour-friends near Helsinki!
I am happy to announce my new series of master-classes
ALL COLORS OF THE AUTUMN
on 15th and 16th of September in AKVART gallery,
Humalistonkatu, 1, Helsinki.

K. Sterkhov. Helsinki. 15x15 cm

These 2 days will consist of 4 blocks.
1 day:
11.00 – 13.30 Wet approach in painting Autumn
14.30 – 17.00 Masking effects in painting Autumn
2 day:
11.00 – 13.30 Combination of wet and dry techniques with miscellaneous in painting Autumn
14.30 – 17.00 Autumn cityscape
1 block – 7 euro, 2 blocks – 10 euro, 4 blocks – 18 euro without practice, just demo. If you decide to participate in practical workshop the fee will be announced later or you can ask Maikki Happala in AKVART.

K. Sterkhov. Raw Boat. Autumn. 38x27 cm

Also you can see my latest demo works which will be available for sale and get acquainting with my video courses and books. Also the signature brushes will be there available.
Book Masters Of Watercolor, vol I
Book Masters Of Watercolor, vol II
DVD Seascapes, 6 subjects
DVD Spring Flowers, 5 subjects
DVD Animals, 6 subjects
DVD Portrait, 2 subjects
DVD + brochure (on Seascape, Landscape, Portrait, subjects of demo are different from other DVD)
Signature watercolor brushes
Mop squirrel-mix # 14
Calligraphy sable-mix # 10
Calligraphy sable-mix # 8
Liner sable #1
Flat poni #40 and #25 

K. Sterkhov. Autumn in Finland. 15x25 cm

All demo paintings made during master-class are available
Some works will be exhibited
It is high time we thought of Christmas presents!